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Checking out the new 10 cent WCH CH32V003 48MHz RISC V processor demo board and the MounRiver Eclipse IDE. Getting to blinky.
The CH32V003 is a pin-for-pin alternative to the STM8S003 at 1/3rd the price, with more features.
http://www.wch-ic.com/products/CH32V003.html
http://www.wch-ic.com/products/categories/47.html?pid=5
https://www.tindie.com/products/adz1122/ch32v003-risc-v-mcu-development-board/
http://www.mounriver.com/download
3 cent Padauk Microcontroller:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYhAGnsnO7w
Padauk Playlist:
00:00 - WCH CH32V003 RISC V Processor
02:01 - CH32V003F4P6 Eval board
03:00 - Pin-for-pin replacement for the ST STM8S003
04:30 - Datasheet and reference manual
05:24 - MounRiver Eclipse IDE
07:13 - It just worked
10:58 - Open Source GNU RISC V Cross Compiler
11:38 - Download and flash a LED, maybe...
13:51 - Save the file first, dummy.
15:26 - All the includes and headers
17:37 - But can you buy them?
18:11 - How fast can the pin toggle?
Forum: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/blog/eevblog-1524-the-10-cent-risc-v-processor-ch32v003/
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#ElectronicsCreators #riscv #microcontroller

By YTB

23 thoughts on “Eevblog 1524 – the 10 cent risc v processor! ch32v003”
  1. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Space Reptile says:

    cant wait to see a few projects actually using this MC, some practical applications instead of just flashing an led as thats pretty boring and does not really sell me on this over any other MC

  2. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Spacewolf Jr. says:

    Moooooun river, wider than a nanometre
    I'm crossing you in style some day
    Oh, DRAM maker, you heart breaker
    Wherever you're goin', I'm polarized your way

  3. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Kattz says:

    Im pretty sure that these are on Ali Express. They were $2-3 Canadian, which is still an unbelievable price. I bought myself a box of microcontrollers to have something to do over the winter. These look like they are better documented than some of the LilyGo devices that I bought.They were a lot more than a couple of dollars.

  4. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Yisrael Dov L says:

    Luh Duh dave!

  5. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars David T says:

    Trust the toolchain?

  6. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Vic Mac says:

    Would this be enough to feed a diy keyboard? If the video has answercI didn't finish it yet..

  7. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars YES! Oジージャン says:

    Real single wire debug interface like STM8S. But HAL lib uses too much FLASH. Hope WCH could release register type library.

  8. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars magfal says:

    My new soldering iron is running a Risc-V CPU.

  9. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Krzysztof Daszuta says:

    Now we need Rust toolchain for this IC and I would call it a day 🙂

  10. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars MisterkeTube says:

    Low-power-modes?

  11. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Adam Bryant says:

    thanks for highlighting it and where to find it.

  12. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Mark Warburton says:

    I'd love to see how good (or bad) the ADC is. There are some absolutely brain-dead examples of ADC uC implementations (be that design, software implementation or hardware). I reckon you can tell a lot about build quality by how well or poorly the ADC performs because it's one of the hardest things to implement with good results.

  13. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Shane Johns says:

    Assembly isn't too bad. It's processor-dependent, so you have to learn it for every kind of chip for which you're programming. My university had it pretty early in the curriculum, I think sophomore year or earlier. And we learned on a DEC VAX. Given the reduced instruction set of RISC, it's expected that you will have to do more work at the coding level anyhow — but usually mostly through loops of some complexity or another. If you know how the newer chips do a routine, you can usually pretty much figure out how to code it – but code optimization is extra-important in such low-level RISC libraries. Back in the day, the selling point was that the chip could essentially run a bit faster because it couldn't do as many things. But looking at that paltry 48 MHz clock speed, I'd say it is more of a miniaturization benefit, and all that comes from that (half as far goes twice as fast, even for electricity…). Even with the benefits of assembly, that 2K of SRAM seems extremely cramped, IMHO. But it's best to get people accustomed to working in that sort of constrained environment, and then see their eyes light up when they double it to 4K of SRAM. This is the sort of chip I would want running the AI auto-defense system of my tank, to protect it from RPGs… Simple (fits within 2K) repetitive looping tasks…

  14. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars N0mad Fernan says:

    hope many manufacturers move on to this cheaper hardware. thank you dave for showcasing this. might as well jump to this risc-v bandwagon if it becomes easily available for cheap

  15. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Shane Johns says:

    64-bit chip unique ID… Wow… So every one of these things is incrementally different where it comes to the unique ID. I'm imagining little assassin mosquito drones running with these super-tiny RISC chips in them… Forgive me, but I just spent the last half hour watching drone videos from Ukraine… I wonder how much of that physical package is actually the chip inside? I suspect that it's significantly artificially larger than it COULD be, just to make it compatible with circuit board designs. Has anyone made a laser layer-by-layer etching video of one of these packages to see how large the silicon is?

  16. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars der.Schtefan says:

    I hate Eclipse since the 90s because of quirks like that. "Save before build" is an option that is OFF by default.

  17. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars ドイティンガークリスティアン says:

    They have a Linux Version 😀

  18. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars 1dfgaJ83K92 says:

    So if you want to make a product with one with their code are there any license fees involved?

  19. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars t1d100 says:

    Cool.

  20. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Rob Cosentino says:

    Sooooo, download the IDE, plug in the RISC V Processor to the programer, flash it, and… Bob's your Uncle!!! 💪

  21. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars K K says:

    Are we seeing a new Arduino 🤩?

  22. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Glen Hinckley says:

    save before build is an option

  23. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Andy Grace says:

    Love the innovation in RISC V but it's a bit more complicated.  

    Sure the instruction set is open source and there are virtual cores online to download and chuck into an FPGA, but the problem is it still requires a licence fee if you want to use one of the well developed ones for a real piece of hardware. Most people use a core from SiFive or similar who've done an incredible amount of good work. Now Intel is behind it, it's going to be interesting. Of course it takes a LOT of engineering to optimise a completely new processor whatever the instruction set, so unless you have a massive budget the options are currently a bit limited.

    The cost isn't much different from using ARM at their lowest tier pricing. ARM is of course amazingly mature with advanced compilers, reference designs, debuggers and so on. One of the reasons ARM is much cheaper than it used to be, is due to the long term threat from RISC V; competition is a great thing.  

    If the Nvidia purchase of ARM Ltd had gone ahead, there would have been an urgent need for many vendors to hedge their bets and rush into RISC V. Now that's been blocked by the European regulators, it's less critical, but still a very active area right now. Microcontrollers offer the most upside right now, rather than servers and desktops although they are beginning to trickle out too.

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